EditorialsYoda Advice

Google Installing Free, Fast WiFi In 400 Indian Train Stations

modi-sundar alt twitter
What a great gesture from Google

Google is reportedly putting up 400 free WiFi spots in 400 train stations across India, a country where an increasing number of tech-savvy consumers are clamoring for internet access. The developing nation mimics ours in some aspects as the growing population struggle to find access to basic internet.

Obviously since the project is coming from Google, it’s not just going to be basic internet – Google is promising speeds in the 400 free WiFi stations to be good enough for streaming HD video via YouTube, naturally.

Google is partnering with Indian Railways and RailTel to provide the bandwidth necessary to finish their ambitious goalsĀ and is targeting to finish the first 100 busiest stations in the country before the end of 2016. Trains are a major mode of transportation for many Indians, and Google’s effort is estimated to help the more than 10 million people who pass the stations every day.

If there was ever a country that needed this project, it’s the PH – with our country lagging behind in terms of internet speed and coverage, it’ll be a fantastic gesture for Google to bring their technology here in the PH. The project doesn’t even need to be as big – they only need to cover the majority of EDSA with fast, WiFi hotspots and they’ll be able to win the hearts of the populace without any troubles at all.

Source

John Nieves

John is a veteran technology and gadget journalist with more than 10 years of experience both in print and online. When not writing about technology, he frequently gets lost in the boonies playing soldier.

Related Articles

3 Comments

  1. From a business standpoint, they have nothing to gain from doing the same in our country and they very well know that it will benefit their rival Facebook more than it does them.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Back to top button
%d bloggers like this: